CSR

Supporting the Next Generation

To support the next generation, RIKEN TECHNOS has been producing a TV program called “YUME Lab” (“Dream Laboratory”) since April 2015. The students featured in the program are all full of energy and have high ambitions. But what is it that drives them? Where did their dreams originate? These are the questions
that the program tries to answer.
These students are still on the journey of fulfilling their dreams, and Yume Lab looks at the ways they are moving forward through trial and error.
We are watching these students closely, wondering what kind of future they will create. RIKEN TECHNOS will continue to support these students as a challenger that harnesses the power of science.

“チャレンジ”する学生の想いに迫る 夢らぼ “チャレンジ”する学生の想いに迫る 夢らぼ “チャレンジ”する学生の想いに迫る 夢らぼ

Students who have appeared in the program in the past

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Seiya Ashikari

It was a very rare opportunity to be interviewed about what I have been doing up till now.
There was also feedback from relevant parties and friends who saw the program, and this opportunity made me feel the importance of letting others know about my activities.

Current and future activities

Current and future activities

I am working on research into breeding insects for use as animal feed to solve food issues. We can expect to use insects as a new type of animal feed for rearing fishes and poultry.
This is especially important now, when the price of fish meal used for fish farming is very expensive, becoming a major issue for producers. Furthermore, fish meal is made from grinding small fish that live in limited numbers in the sea, which is not sustainable. It is my dream to solve these issues using insect fodder, which is both economically and environmentally sustainable. Using fish to rear fish is the standard in fish farming, and I aim to break away from this using the power of entomology. Going forward, I am working on applying the results of my research so far for commercial use. I will continue to work hard so that the insect fodder I develop will be used by fish farmers.
Although there are still issues before we can reach a society where consumers are able to accept safe and delicious farmed fish reared using insect fodder, I will do my best to achieve my dream.

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Hinae Niori

I am very happy to be able to appear in YUME Lab along with others of the same generation doing their best in different fields. It was an opportunity to reflect on what I have been doing.
After the program was aired, I also received feedback from people outside Tokyo. I am very happy to receive the support from so many people. I hope to work together with everyone as the generation creating the future. It was a moment that braced me up to continue doing what I can to the best of my abilities so as to work toward an even better society in the future.

Current and future activities

Current and future activities

hope to continue working on businesses that can contribute to the happiness of families, such as Kazoku ryugaku (family study). Kazoku ryugaku is a life career program where young people visit families raising children and meet various role models by experiencing and talking about raising children. It is active in 22 prefectures throughout Japan.
We also hope to expand our collaboration with other companies. Our goal is to have women in 30% of leading positions by 2020. Kazoku ryugaku is joined by many people who want to continue working and progressing in their careers after giving birth. However, they are uncertain about carrying on with their work due to a lack of role models. I think companies will be expected to provide all kinds of support in recruitment and development to create places where such women can apply themselves. To support women’s success in the workplace, manma hopes to reflect the voices of the parties concerned and provide programs and training for women to apply themselves.

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Masahiro Kasuya

I thought it was extremely meaningful that the program discovers and actively introduces people who are involved in distinct activities. I'm grateful for having been introduced in this way because it is difficult to increase our name recognition, especially in this early phase of our activities.

Current and future activities

Current and future activities

I am part of the team at Meltin MMI, where we create prosthetics using cybernetics. Our biggest activity will be the world’s first Cybathlon, which will be held in October 2016.
This event, which will be the third biggest international sports event following the Olympic and Paralympic Games, allows participants to use computer and motor support, which are not allowed in the Paralympic Games. As a result, people who haven’t previously been allowed to participate in sport events will be able to do so. For example, a person whose legs are paralyzed will be able to compete in cycling races. Meltin MMI will compete in the Powered Arm Prosthesis Race and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Bike Race at the Cybathlon, and we are carrying out daily development work in preparation.
Meltin MMI received venture capital funding in 2015, and our media exposure has also been increasing. For example, we were invited to give a keynote address at an IBM event, covered in a front-page newspaper article, and featured in a TV special. Ahead of the Cybathlon, NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) will air a documentary produced by following us closely over a six-month period. This year, in addition to competing in the Cybathlon, we plan to release a prosthetic device that the wearer can move using biological signals. We will continue to widen our perspective and ambitiously engage in activities.

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Thoughts after appearing in a YUME Lab episode

Naomi Iwazawa

YUME Lab gave me a precious opportunity to talk about my thoughts and activities. The need to communicate my thoughts to many people within a limited time helped me take a retrospective look at myself.
The program gave me the chance to consider questions such as: “Why did I come to think this way?” “What was I like as a child?” I was happy to know that my experiences in the past have made me who I am now.
Learning things I didn’t know and exchanging views with people with different values to me was an extremely valuable experience. I will value the connections I made with these people as I continue my activities.

Current and future activities

Current and future activities

I have a dream. My dream is to help create a society that accepts diversity and embraces differences.
My organization, Culmony, conducts non-profit activities under this vision, with the involvement of about 500 people.
We provide children with English conversation classes combined with intercultural understanding, as well as local opportunities for international exchange. Culmony has also been running a home tutoring business that delivers a unique multicultural education program to children. Modern Japanese society is full of cultural clashes, so there is a lot we can do to improve it.
I believe that if Culmony can expand educational programs that nurture children’s ability to embrace diversity, we can develop people who will be able to create a more vibrantricherese society while cooperating with others within the global society. I want to grow so that I can manage Culmony well, and continue to work hard to expand it after graduating from university.